Deadly 'swatting' suspect's extradition to Kansas could take up to 90 days

Deadly 'swatting' suspect's extradition to Kansas could take up to 90 days

Tyler Barriss appears at an extradition hearing in Los Angeles on January 3, 2018. Barriss acknowledged that he is the person wanted in Kansas, and he waived his right to an extradition hearing.

Marc Bennett told The Times in an interview Tuesday that he could not release the arrest warrant or discuss potential charges against Barris until he first appears in court in Los Angeles. It is unclear if he has a lawyer.

Andrew Finch was the innocent victim of a deadly prank call made from 1,300 miles away that prompted police in Kansas to storm his home and shoot him to death. In a posting on Twitter at 6:21 p.m. ET Dec. 29, Taylor personally offered a reward of $7,777 in Bitcoin for information about the real-life identity of SWAuTistic. Central Time when authorities there received a 911 call from a man who said he had shot his father in the head while his parents were arguing.

SWAuTistic sought out an interview with KrebsOnSecurity on the afternoon of December 29, in which he said he routinely faked hostage and bomb threat situations to emergency centers across the country in exchange for money.

The police chief called Finch's death a "terrible tragedy". Upon arriving at the scene, officers surrounded the front of the house, preparing to make contact with the caller inside and for the potential situation of a suspect barricaded with hostages, police said.

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An attorney on behalf of the mother, Lisa Finch, and her family are calling for the police officer who shot and killed her son while responding to the alleged fake call to be charged over his death. Wichita authorities say the man was shot when he lowered his hands toward his waistband. However, footage from a police body camera shows that the officer was positioned across the street from the Finch home behind the cover of several vehicles. Finch died at a hospital. When Finch went to the door, police told him to put his hands up and move slowly. No one else was injured during the incident, police said.

A gamer who claimed to have made the call to police tweeted, "I DIDNT GET ANYONE KILLED BECAUSE I DIDNT DISCHARGE A WEAPON AND BEING A SWAT MEMBER ISNT MY PROFESSION".

Police spokesman Charley Davidson said the department has not received Lisa Finch's letter and can not comment on it. Finch's mother said her son was not a gamer. The officer who fired the shot has been placed on administrative leave, which Livingston said is standard protocol. Livingston did not name that officer but said he's a seven-year veteran of the department.

Glendale police said since the calls were made around the country, the Federal Bureau of Investigation would take the scope of the cases.

It could take the Sedgwick County District Attorney's office upto 90 days to extradite Tyler Barriss to Kansas, where he committed the crime, the Los Angeles Times reported. He was sentenced to two years in a California jail for phoning in false bomb threats in 2015 to the ABC Studios in Glendale, prompting an evacuation and a search with police dogs.

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