Manafort sues Mueller, Justice Department for exceeding legal authority in Russia probe

Manafort sues Mueller, Justice Department for exceeding legal authority in Russia probe

Paul Manafort, Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, has decided that he wants to fight Mueller in court - and by extension Dreeben.

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort at 2016 Republican National Convention.

As I've written before, there is a growing chorus of conservatives in and out of government who are increasingly critical of Mueller personally and the Russian Federation probe more broadly.

Mr. Manafort asked a federal judge to reject Mr. Mueller's appointment as overly broad and to dismiss the indictment against him.

Manafort's legal team alleges the deputy attorney general went beyond his "authority to appoint a special council as well as specific restrictions on the scope of such appointments".

"Manafort, as an unregistered foreign agent, is vulnerable not so much because he might get a few years in prison, but because under the Foreign Agent Registration Act, he can be stripped of every dollar that prosecutor Mueller can show came from a foreign government", Johnston continued.

A spokesman for Mr. Mueller had no comment on the lawsuit. They say the Justice Department reviewed Mr. Manafort's finances for years and never brought charges until Mr. Mueller put together his team of prosecutors. He could still face charges if new prosecutors made a decision to bring them.

More news: Both fresh and frozen embryos offer similar chances of baby after IVF
More news: Flores in the frame succeed Mark Hughes at Stoke
More news: NAACP to protest Trump in Atlanta

Manafort also claims deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein (an Obama holdover) committed an "abuse of discretion" when he appointed special counsel Robert Mueller, calling the appointment illegal.

Donald Trump's supporters seem to have found a new way to discredit the Russian Federation investigation. The complaint accuses Rosenstein of exceeding that authority that the regulations say he has, Wisenberg said.

"It's a circular argument", he said. He also is accused of hiding offshore accounts. They both pleaded not guilty.

The charges were related to Manafort's lobbying work on behalf of a Russia-friendly Ukrainian political party.

Manafort claimed in the lawsuit that federal prosecutors and FBI agents interviewed him in 2014 to discuss his consulting activities overseas as part of an effort to assist the government of Ukraine to recover stolen property.

They included his frequent contact with U.S. diplomats in Kiev "and his efforts to further United States objectives in Ukraine on their behalf". That case has been ongoing since October and has already resulted in a series of pretrial disputes that, more or less, have found Manafort on the losing end; he remains in home confinement, has been ordered to forfeit $10 million in assets, and was embarrassed by the disclosure that he helped edit a pro-Ukraine op-ed while under house arrest.

He said that during the 2014 interview, he discussed in detail his activities in Ukraine, his relationships with diplomats in Kyiv, and his offshore banking in Cyprus. He has called on Mueller to treat him fairly, but the special counsel could choose to seek an indictment against the President if he finds incriminating evidence, according to CNN. On September 12, Manafort's current attorney, Kevin Downing, wrote a letter to Rosenstein asking if he granted Mueller "additional jurisdiction" to investigate Manafort for white-collar crimes dating to 2006 and tax crimes in 2010.

Related Articles