Five Food Customs You Should Know for Lunar New Year

Five Food Customs You Should Know for Lunar New Year

Chinese New Year in Kolkata will be celebrated on Friday 16, 2018, welcoming the Year of the Dog, and bidding farewell to the Year of the Rooster. Tied to the Chinese lunar calendar, the holiday was traditionally a time to honor household and heavenly deities as well as ancestors. The average Chinese tourist spends about 9,500 yuan ($1,500) on a Lunar New Year trip, the report said. It was made a public holiday in 1914 during China's Republican period and was reinstituted by the government of the People's Republic of China in 1949.

China's big cities like Beijing are running short of domestic helpers as migrant workers, who make up a majority of the workforce, return to their hometowns for Spring Festival, China Daily reported Wednesday.

"We are starting to celebrate with our kids, because our Chinese connections are getting larger as they get older", he says.

In Guangzhou, flower fairs are popular at New Year, and all over southern China, lantern displays are common. Bright red is the preeminent color of festivity, symbolic of good health and fortune, wealth, prosperity and longevity.

How Chinese Celebrate Spring Festival?

People sit around the table and enjoy traditional food.

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Instead of a dragon dance, Gaw recommends a lion dance because the dragon sign is unlucky this year.

Did you know the Chinese New Year holidays are about to begin? It is an expression of good wishes for all achievements and opportunities in the coming year.

In the first five days of the New Year, people eat long noodles to symbolize long life. The products are available online and in-store just in time for the New Year. "The artwork on the lovely, technical product incorporates traditional elements of the New Year Festival and Chinese culture, including red hues and delicate floral artwork", the company said.

Commenting about the upcoming event, Esther Dobbin, Commercial Operations Manager at the Giant's Causeway said: "The Chinese tourist market is increasingly important for us and we are delighted to welcome a growing number of visitors from China to the Giant's Causeway every year".

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