May mulls Syria action despite cautious mood in UK

May mulls Syria action despite cautious mood in UK

During the two-hour meeting yesterday afternoon, ministers agreed to join forces with the U.S. and France to prevent Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad's forces from launching an "appalling and inhumane" attack again.

In London, British Prime Minister Theresa May summoned her Cabinet back from vacation Thursday to discuss military action against Syria.

Laurence Geai/SIPA/NewscomPresident Trump says there will be a "big price to pay" for the horrific chemical weapons attack reported in the rebel-held area of Eastern Ghouta, Syria.

In the call, the two leaders had agreed that the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad "had established a pattern of risky behaviour in relation to the use of chemical weapons", Downing Street said.

Downing Street said the Prime Minister spoke to the USA and French presidents on Tuesday, and said they had agreed to "continue working closely together" to ensure those responsible were "held to account".

Russian military police have started patrolling the site of last weekend's alleged chemical attack in Syria.

Trump has never been skeptical of war, but he seeks to avoid regime change projects because his nationalist agenda has no place for the cost and responsibility of foreign nation-building (and, in recent years, cycles of insurgency, military surge, and reconstruction) they inevitably incur. Israel has said it won't let Iran entrench militarily in Syria, and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu took the occasion of Israel's Holocaust Remembrance Day to warn Tehran not to test his country.

Opposition lawmakers have called on May to give Parliament a vote before committing British troops.

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Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said on Wednesday that MPs "should always be given a say on military action".

A separate YouGov survey on Thursday found 61 percent of people think it would be necessary for parliament to vote on military action against Syria, with just 18 percent saying it was not necessary and 21 percent undecided.

But they backed action in Iraq the following year, and again in Syria in 2015, strictly limiting strikes to Islamic State (IS) group targets.

"We continue to consider it extremely important to avoid any steps that could lead to more tension in Syria", Mr Peskov said.

"Our president has not yet made a decision about possible action in Syria", Ms. Haley told the council. Trump tweeted Wednesday that missiles "will be coming" and on Thursday tweeted that an attack "could be very soon or not so soon at all!"

She was one of 30 Conservative MPs to reject possible United Kingdom military action against Syria to deter the use of chemical weapons, after a vote was called by the then-Prime Minister David Cameron.

Other members of May's Conservative party have urged restraint in a highly fraught situation.

"We have not yet made any decision to launch military attacks into Syria", Mattis told lawmakers on the House Armed Services committee.

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