United Kingdom opposition leader says no legal basis for attack on Syria

United Kingdom opposition leader says no legal basis for attack on Syria

May said the aim was to deter the Syrian authorities from further use of chemical weapons and to send a message to the wider world that it was unacceptable to use such weapons.

British Prime Minister Theresa May said on Saturday she had authorized British forces to conduct precision air-launched cruise missile strikes on Syria to degrade its chemical weapons capability, saying there was no alternative to military action.

President Donald Trump said the air strikes were in response to the "evil and despicable" chemical attack on April 7 which left "mothers and fathers, infants and children, thrashing in pain and gasping for air".

The British PM said the attack was specifically a reaction to the use of chemical weapons, and was not about a regime change.

"This is not about intervening in a civil war".

U.S., British, and French forces launched air strikes against targets in Syria in the first coordinated Western military action against the Damascus regime.

"We have hit a specific and limited set of targets", she said.

May said the strikes would "send a clear signal to anyone else who believes they can use chemical weapons with impunity".

Britain's defence ministry said in a statement that four British Tornado jets had fired Storm Shadow missiles at the Syrian base 24 km west of Homs at 0100 GMT.

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She added that she would address parliament on Monday. "We can not allow the use of chemical weapons to become normalized - within Syria, on the streets of the United Kingdom, or anywhere else in our world".

Iranian President Rouhani says US-led military strikes in Syria will cause "destruction" in the Middle East.

Prime Minister Theresa May during a press conference in 10 Downing Street, London on the air strikes against Syria.

Polls in recent days have shown public wariness of military intervention in Syria, with Britain still haunted by its participation in the US-led invasion of Iraq.

Former PM David Cameron, who lost a vote in 2013 on taking action in Syria, said Mrs May was right to take action.

"As we have seen in the past, inaction has its consequences - so PM right to join forces with our allies to take targeted & appropriate action".

"Bombing can not substitute for diplomacy", he said.

"The Syrian regime has continued to use chemical weapons and will continue to do so".

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in a statement that Canada stands with its allies and that it supports the decision " to take action to degrade the Assad regime's ability to launch chemical weapons attacks against its own people".

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