Whalers accused of slaughtering endangered blue whale off coast of Iceland

Whalers accused of slaughtering endangered blue whale off coast of Iceland

"This man must be stopped from ruthlessly violating global conservation law and bringing such disrepute to the nation of Iceland".

Sea Shepherd volunteers monitoring the Hvalur hf whaling station in Hvalfjordur, Iceland, claim to have documented the slaughter of an endangered Blue whale on the night of July 7.

Since then, countries like Norway, Iceland, and Japan have ignored worldwide laws and have brazenly hunted whales, including endangered species like Fin whales and the Blue whale caught by Icelandic whalers just recently.

Hard to Port also agreed the whale could be a hybrid, according to ABC News.

In a statement released on July 11, Sea Shepherd said they had contacted several scientific experts specializing in whale identification and came to the conclusion that "The whale is without question a blue whale".

The whaling company accused of killing the blue whale, Kvalur hf, has denied any wrongdoing.

If these fears are confirmed, it would be the first official blue whale to be harpooned in half a century.

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It has all the characteristics of a blue whale; given that - notably the coloration pattern, ' Dr Phillip Clapham from NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Centre said.

"This whale, when you see it swimming in the ocean, it was like a fin whale", he explained.

Activists want the animal to have DNA tests to prove it is a blue whale.

It is believed there are maximum of 25,000 blue whales in the world and only five hybrids have been in identified in Iceland since 1986.

This past hunting season, Japan's whalers headed out to the Antarctic yet again to hunt whales, particularly, Minke whales, killing 333 of them, including 122 pregnant females and 114 juveniles.

Sea Shepherd founder Paul Watson, who has spent over a half a century defending whales, appealed to Icelandic authorities to stop Loftsson "from ruthlessly violating global conservation law and bringing such disrepute to the nation of Iceland". Simmonds, said: "This bad incident comes as Japan is rumoured to be planning an attempt to overturn the global moratorium on commercial whaling, and clearly speaks to how utterly inappropriate it is for countries to even contemplate allowing a large-scale return to this grossly inhumane and haphazard industry". One has not been slaughtered for more than 50 years.

No blue whales have deliberately been caught since 1978, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature reports.

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