Druze army vets campaign against Israel's Jewish state law

Druze army vets campaign against Israel's Jewish state law

It makes no mention of equality or democracy, implying that the country's Jewish character takes precedence, and speaks of Israel as the historic homeland of the Jews, who have a "unique" right to self-determination within its borders.

Livni apologized to members of the Druze community "not just for the problematic and discriminatory law, but for the fact that he (Netanyahu) didn't bother showing up here for the discussion, to talk, to stand here and give the answers he owes not just you, the Druze community, but to the entire State of Israel".

Finally, on the issue of Diaspora Jewry, she notes that the law explicitly mentions that "the state will act within the Diaspora to strengthen the affinity between the state and members of the Jewish people" and says that the language chosen to refer to activities in the Diaspora alone was to "avoid an undemocratic situation in which a constitutional "right" would effectively bind the Israeli Government to make decisions based on how they would be perceived overseas".

An Arab rights group in Israel has filed a petition with the Supreme Court against the country's new and controversial Jewish state law.

"In a almost 60-page document, the petitioners call on the Israeli Supreme Court to annul the Jewish Nation-State Basic Law, which is racist legislation that contradicts all norms of worldwide law", the statement reads.

The law, which the petition described as "racist, colonialist and illegitimate", was passed by Israel's parliament late last month.

The petition says that the law is "racist, massively harmful to fundamental human rights and contravenes global human rights norms, especially those forbidding laws that constitute a racist constitution". The law was first proposed in the Knesset in August 2011. "There is also no single constitution in the world that does not include the right to equality for all its citizens and residents".

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Over the weekend, Druze leaders led a protest that drew tens of thousands to Tel Aviv's Rabin Square, where a former head of the Mossad, a former IDF chief and the mayor of Tel Aviv were among those to speak out in opposition to the law.

The legislation was passed as a so-called basic law, which, similar to a constitution, underpin Israel's legal system and are more hard to repeal than regular laws.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (C) meets with Sheikh Muafak Tariff, spiritual leader of Israel's Druze community, Communications Minister Ayoub Kara (L) and other Druze leaders at his office in Jerusalem to discuss the nation-state law on July 27, 2018.

The Israeli High Court has made no moves to overturn Basic Law legislation to date, prompting fears that the petitions will achieve little more than media coverage.

The nation-state law is part of Israel's so-called Basic Law, a de facto constitution.

Druze leaders, including three MKs, were first to demand the High Court strike down the "extremist" law.

On Sunday, two Bedouin former IDF officers also called on the High Court to either change the formulation of the law so it applies equally to all Israelis or abolish it completely.

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