How to see the Perseid meteor shower peak this weekend

The shower is expected to peak on the night of Sunday August 12, though Saturday and Monday will also offer excellent views.

Every year, in mid-August, Earth passes collides with particles spread along the orbit of Comet Swift-Tuttle.

Every 133 years or so, the massive Swift-Tuttle comet careens through our solar system at 150 times the speed of sound, spreading a dirty trail of ice, dust and sundry space schmutz behind it.

Anyone who was disappointed by the brightness of the almost full moon obscuring the Perseid meteor shower past year will have a chance to turn their stargazing luck around this month.

Muscat: The Sultanate is now witnessing the Perseids, which are the most famous meteor showers. In those cases they can actually predict that when the Earth passes through the orbital path of the comet there will be a higher than average debris field.

NASA meteor expert, Bill Cooke, told Space.com: "The moon is very favourable for the Perseids this year, and that'll make the Perseids probably the best shower for 2018 for people who want to go out and view it". But the most spectacular long-lasting meteors, known as "Earthgrazers", can be seen when the radiant is still low above the horizon.

The best time to see those meteors is at around 11 p.m. ET until dawn the next morning.

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By Monday morning, that boundary should have cleared and it looks like viewing conditions will be good for just about all of New England.

From Aug.11-13, the Perseid meteor shower will send between 60 and 70 meteors shooting across the sky every hour.

You will be in for a treat as this means roughly one per minute.

"The meteors you'll see this year are from comet flybys that occurred hundreds if not thousands of years ago", Cooke said.

Meteors streak across the night sky during the Orionid meteor shower on October 23, 2016. "Remember, you don't have to look directly at the constellation to see them".

If you're interested in the best possible views of the show should set up shop somewhere dark-with no light pollution or large buildings-where much of the sky is visible.

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