Teeth from ancient mega-shark discovered on Australian beach

Teeth from ancient mega-shark discovered on Australian beach

The shark could be found in Australia's oceans 25 million years ago, and survived by eating small whales and penguins.

The museum said the teeth belonged to an extinct species called the Great Jagged Narrow-Toothed Shark (Carcharocles angustidens), which could grow to twice the size of a great white.

"These teeth are of worldwide significance, as they represent one of just three associated groupings of Carcharocles angustidens teeth in the world, and the very first set ever to be discovered in Australia", stated Dr. Erich Fitzgerald, a Senior Curator of Vertebrate Palaeontology. This ancient shark was over 30 feet in length and was one of the most magnificent sea predators of its times, and was closely related with the famous Megalodon.

Erich Fitzgerald of Museums Victoria confirmed the species for Mullaly and explained just how special of a find they are.

Mullaly donated the teeth to the Melbourne Museum, where they are on display until October 7.

Mullaly donated the teeth to Museums Victoria in Australia to keep as part of their collection.

Paleontologist-a lover Philip Mullaly came across a unique artifact when walking through the countryside, Jan-JUC, located about 100 kilometers from Melbourne.

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"These teeth are of global significance, as they represent one of just three associated groupings of Carcharocles angustidens teeth in the world, and the very first set to ever be discovered in Australia", Fitzgerald said. This is because sharks can lose even one tooth a day and their skeletons are made of cartilage, which is hard to fossilize.

Fitzgerald's team has finished their field research and are now working to learn more about how the teeth of the Great Jagged Narrow-Toothed shark developed in order to better understand its evolutionary history. However, Fitzgerald said that finding multiple teeth from a single shark is extremely rare.

"Sixgill sharks still exist off the Victorian coast today, where they live off the remains of whales and other animals".

"This find suggests they have performed that lifestyle here for tens of millions of years", Museums Victoria paleontologist Tim Ziegler said.

Fitzgerald also determined that all of the teeth most likely came from the same individual shark.

"I'm willing to bet there's more up there", he said.

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