Donald trump moved one of the European visits

Donald trump moved one of the European visits

The US president announced his intention to visit taking the Government by surprise, but in an about-turn so redolent of the main man himself, it seems the plans have been changed.

According to Gavan Reilly, of Virgin Media News, 'U.S. officials in contact with Irish counterparts about planning it, say it won't go ahead'.

His office later said it was still possible Mr Trump will take up Mr Varadkar's invitation at a future date, but confirmed November's trip will not be happening.

Varadkar said then that Trump's decision to accept an open invitation "came a little bit out of the blue".

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar invited Mr Trump to Ireland during a meeting at the St Patrick's Day celebrations in Washington in March.

Mr Varadkar said there is a standing invitation for any U.S. president to come to Ireland and many have in the past.

Trump had planned to spend one day in the Irish capital before traveling to a Trump golf course in Doonbeg, in County Clare. Other protests were planned in Dublin and other Irish cities.

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Following the confirmation of Mr Trump's visit there had been calls for protests.

The Government had begun preparations for the visit after it was announced by the White House two weeks ago.

The Irish Green Party, which had strongly opposed Mr Trump's visit, described the cancellation as "erratic".

"The proposed visit of the USA president is postponed", an Irish government spokesman told Reuters.

Brendan Howlin, the leader of the Labour Party in the Republic of Ireland, said that Mr Trump was "no friend of democracy or human rights".

Two Independent Alliance ministers - Finian McGrath and John Halligan - had also pledged to take part in any public demonstrations during the visit.

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