NASA shared these chilling images of Hurricane Florence from space

Florence is now a powerful Category 3 storm with winds of 125mph, and is expected to strengthen before making landfall along the Carolina coast later this week.

European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst tweeted pictures taken 249 miles above the eye of the storm.

Describing Hurricane Florence as "a no-kidding nightmare" is certainly appropriate, with Gerst warning Americans on the East Coast to prepare for the storm's arrival.

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Images captured with a wide-angle lens on board the Space Station have shown the mind-boggling scale of Hurricane Florence as it nears America's East Coast.

Hurricane Florence is now bearing down on the Southeast, specifically the Carolina's, and the slow-moving hurricane has everyone anxious with the amount of rain it could dump, with a potential to cause massive flooding-not to mention the damage from 80 mile-per-hour winds expected later today.

Another photo (embedded below) was snapped on September 10 by astronaut Ricky Arnold while aboard the International Space Station. While the wind in the eye weakened, the storm grew in size and the hurricane-force winds expanding outward up to 70 miles (110 kilometers) from the center of the hurricane. The photo shows the churning storm, which according to Arnold, was later joined by Hurricane Isaac and Hurricane Helene. For example, after Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, NASA used its Black Marble HD technology (which is usually used for NASA to see lights on Earth at night) to help identify where power had been knocked out.

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