UK Parliament approves Brexit amendment on replacing Irish backstop

UK Parliament approves Brexit amendment on replacing Irish backstop

Leading Conservative Brexiteers indicated they may not support "alternative arrangements" to keep the Irish border open, while the DUP - which props up Theresa May's minority Government - called on the Prime Minister to "face down the stubbornness of Dublin and Brussels".

The UK government of Theresa May will try to get the Brexit deal approved in House of Commons after crushing defeat two weeks ago.

"There can be no change to the backstop". The U.K. joined the bloc in 1973, and held a 2016 referendum on its membership that was won by the "leave" side. If you want to tell Brussels what this House will accept, you have to vote for it. We have achieved collectively between opposition and Government a backstop to prevent a hardening of the border and to protect the Good Friday Agreement. "It is not re-negotiable".

But May's official spokesman said she told her Cabinet that "in order to win the support of the House of Commons, legal changes to the controversial Irish backstop will be required".

British Prime Minister Theresa May will seek to renegotiate the European Union divorce deal, her spokesman said Tuesday, ahead of crunch votes in parliament that could reset the course for Brexit.

Weyand said that the Brexit deal was shaped by London, and the country's parliament should treat it as a win.

The EU insists the Brexit agreement can not be reopened.

The dispute between Madrid and London has already threatened to derail the whole Brexit negotiation process, but a last-minute deal with Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez cleared the way in November for the 27 European Union states to approve the divorce package. It calls for the Irish border proposal to be replaced with "alternative arrangements".

Mrs. May's gamble is that Europe - keen to avoid such a messy "no-deal" Brexit and frustrated by the fact that Britain has failed as yet to speak with one voice on the matter, might give her some new leeway if she presents a plan with solid parliamentary backing. But she vowed to go to Brussels and seek "significant and legally binding change" to the backstop. The EU has repeatedly refused to budge.

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At the weekend, Ireland's foreign minister, Simon Coveney, stated baldly the backstop simply "isn't going to change".

NO-DEAL BREXIT: If Britain and the European Union do not finalize a divorce deal, Britain will cease to be an European Union member on March 29 without an agreement setting out what happens next. Mrs May's approach drew praise from Brexit-backing politicians but prompted scorn from their pro-EU colleagues.

But Green Party legislator Caroline Lucas accused May of chasing "heated-up fantasies that have already been rejected by the European Union".

Mrs May addressed MPs in Westminster on the eve of a day of high drama, when MPs will debate a range of rival amendments, including calls to block a no-deal departure or delay Brexit from its scheduled date of March 29. "The EU side is in agreement that a time-limit to the Irish backstop defeats the objective of having one".

This was one of the seven amendments to the Brexit bill being voted on in parliament.

She said that a lot of the discussion of the withdrawal agreement in the United Kingdom was "uninhibited by any knowledge" of what it contained.

This group spans the political divide and includes finance minister Philip Hammond and top members of the main opposition Labour party. May said if she has not struck a new Brexit deal by February 13, Parliament would get to vote, again, on what should happen next.

So does she today recognise that the game is up and her only hope is to enter cross-party talks on a soft Brexit deal that could get through the Commons but would destroy her party? So it is in fact up to the Speaker of the parliament to decide which proposals will be debated.

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