World's oceans heating up at quickening pace

World's oceans heating up at quickening pace

Heat trapped by greenhouse gases is raising ocean temperatures faster than previously thought, concludes an analysis of four recent ocean heating observations.

Data due for publication next week will show "2018 was the warmest year on record for the global ocean, surpassing 2017", said lead author Lijing Cheng, of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

"Ocean heating is a very important indicator of climate change, and we have robust evidence that it is warming more rapidly than we thought", said co-author Zeke Hausfather, a graduate student in the Energy and Resources Group at the University of California, Berkeley. According to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) models, the temperature of the top 2,000 meters of global oceans will increase by 0.78 degrees Celsius by 2099. Also, the quality of older ocean data has been substantially improved, and there are both better and independent methods that account for the sparseness of ocean data before Argo era.

A year ago is expected to be the hottest for the oceans on record - explaining the wild fires, severe storms, record breaking rains and droughts that swept the world.

Greenhouse gases warm the air and according to scientists, that heat gets absorbed by oceans.

The study authors say the warming is happening because of climate change created by such human activities as the burning of fossil fuels. This Trend has far-reaching consequences for fish or other organisms in the already oxygen-poor marine regions, for example, because in particular large fish in oxygen are not able to survive poor areas. 2015 is next warmest, although 2016 was the hottest for the global mean surface temperature, but that was in part because of the huge El Niño event that took place: the extra heat at the surface was at the expense of the ocean which cooled off slightly.

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According to the investigation, the temperature of the oceans have increased in a depth of up to 2000 meters between 1971-2010 by 0.1 degrees Celsius.

He told Reuters that records for ocean warming had been broken nearly yearly since 2000.

Warmer ocean water also raises sea levels by melting ice, including around the edges of Antarctica and Greenland. The 2013 United Nations assessment estimated slower rates of heat uptake but did not give a single comparable number.

A separate study on Monday, by the European Union's Copernicus Climate Change Service, said 2018 was the fourth warmest year for global surface temperatures in records dating back to the 19th century.

People jump into the Atlantic Ocean during the annual Polar Bear Plunge on New Year's Day in Coney Island on January 1, 2019 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.

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