Manfred: No DH or draft changes likely for 2019

Manfred: No DH or draft changes likely for 2019

The first official disabled list was introduced by the National League in 1915, so after 104 years, perhaps it was finally time to get with the times.

Those changes include the introduction of a 20-second pitch clock, a reduction in mound visits from six to five, and the placement of a baserunner on second base when spring training games - and the All-Star Game - reach extra innings.

The commissioner added that he's "hopeful" about the process of change happening with the Major League Baseball.

There's no guarantee any of those changes will be implemented in 2019.

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The Major League Baseball Players Association reportedly proposed a universal designated hitter as part of its back-and-forth with the league regarding rule changes for the upcoming season, according to The Athletic's Ken Rosenthal. "And I hope we can focus on some of the issues that need to get resolved quickly in the interim".

"I think that's just in an effort to try not to put the game in a test tube", Torre said. "The principal concern is that using the term "disabled" for players who are injured supports the misconception that people with disabilities are injured and therefore are not able to participate or compete in sports".

Clubs were notified of the change in a December 20 memo to clubs from Jeff Pfeifer, senior director of league economics and operations in the commissioner's office. Formerly known as the "disabled list", MLB will now call it the "injured list", the league confirmed this week. The change was first reported by ESPN. "In recent years, the commissioner has received several inquiries regarding the name of the "Disabled List, '" Pfeifer wrote. This change, which is only a rebranding of the name itself, is effective immediately". Teams can place players on the list for 10 days or 60 days, in which case a ballclub can add a player through free agency, trade or promotion from the minors as a replacement. The most notable changes that jumped out to baseball fans were the union's proposal for a universal designated hitter and the league's proposal that all pitchers must face a minimum of three hitters per appearance.

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